On being insecure about younger people being more successful

Reese writes:

And when I see peers being successful, it’s not that I’m not happy for them. I am! But it sometimes register as an attack. I imagine that for every bit of success handed over to somebody else, that is one chunk taken from the success pie of the world. It’s a disgusting way of thinking, really. It’s almost as if I’m running out of success – as if it was a perishable resource that I alone can hoard. Thoughts like “Why can’t I be more like him / her?” come barging in through the folds of my brain until I go on a self-destructive mode. Not pretty.

Knowing that, I’ve taken to avoiding the Facebook timeline just to prevent the possibility of having negative feelings towards innocently successful friends. Not only does this save me a lot of time (productivity wise, it really does wonders) but it also helps me direct all my energy to improving myself…

The good news is…
- Everyone feels insecure and inadequate at some point in their lives. It’s normal, but we may need an attitude shift to fight it.
- Our chances of finding success (whatever that might mean) does not end once we lose our teenage years. And there’s not much difference between a successful kid and a successful adult, except the kid might still have to go to the pressures of high school, and adults are so over that. The workforce is where the drama is at, y’all.
- The world is not going to run out of successes. Chill out!

We are all worthy and we’re all entitled to our own successes, which we often achieve through a combination of immeasurable hard-work and a bit of luck. Let the child prodigies be prodigies. They got there because they’re probably all smarter and better-equipped than all of us. Let friends become well-off and successful because true friends are kind of obliged to be happy for other friends. Yeah.

Read more!

f-eel-s:

Every river in the United States. (via Kotke.org)

After Antibiotics, the Feces Pill (“Crapsule”) Remains

By the time patients arrive at the office of Bruce Hirsch, an infectious disease specialist at North Shore University Hospital in Long Island, they’re desperate. Many have diarrhea that strikes up to 20 times a day. They eagerly pay $1,200 out of pocket for the only thing that might make their lives normal again.

Hirsch offers them an orange pill, which they swallow. Underneath the pill’s outer shell are several smaller gel capsules. Inside the smallest capsule is a glycerin-suspended clump of bacteria that’s been extracted from human feces.

“Our experience of stool is this brief, six-inch flight time from rectum to water.” 

“It’s like a Russian doll,” Hirsch told me. “With a surprise in the middle.”

Hirsch is one of just a few dozen specialists in the country who perform fecal transplants—procedures used primarily to treat people who have severe gut infections caused by an overgrowth of a bacteria called Clostridium difficile.

Read more…

“Don’t pretend to be someone you’re not by blindly applying success recipes, productivity lists, life hacks–or even worse, forcing these down another person’s throat. Most of (but not all) the time, you’re your best teacher.”
I love Marilyn Monroe. She was underrated, especially for her musical talents.


I never get tired of this photo.
Ella Fitzgerald was not allowed to play at Mocambo because of her race. Then, one of Ella’s biggest fans made a telephone call that quite possibly changed the path of her career for good. Here, Ella tells the story of how Marilyn Monroe changed her life:
“I owe Marilyn Monroe a real debt… she personally called the owner of the Mocambo, and told him she wanted me booked immediately, and if he would do it, she would take a front table every night. She told him – and it was true, due to Marilyn’s superstar status – that the press would go wild. The owner said yes, and Marilyn was there, front table, every night. The press went overboard. After that, I never had to play a small jazz club again. She was an unusual woman – a little ahead of her times. And she didn’t know it.”
I love Marilyn Monroe. She was underrated, especially for her musical talents.

I never get tired of this photo.

Ella Fitzgerald was not allowed to play at Mocambo because of her race. Then, one of Ella’s biggest fans made a telephone call that quite possibly changed the path of her career for good. Here, Ella tells the story of how Marilyn Monroe changed her life:

“I owe Marilyn Monroe a real debt… she personally called the owner of the Mocambo, and told him she wanted me booked immediately, and if he would do it, she would take a front table every night. She told him – and it was true, due to Marilyn’s superstar status – that the press would go wild. The owner said yes, and Marilyn was there, front table, every night. The press went overboard. After that, I never had to play a small jazz club again. She was an unusual woman – a little ahead of her times. And she didn’t know it.”

(Source: noseasboba)

TERRIFYING. Typhoon Haiyan (Yolanda) flood rushing in and carrying a house away! :( Please help typhoon survivors any way you can. Here’s my own list of sustainable relief efforts:

For me, sustainability means improving health (physical and psychological), reducing waste, helping the environment, restoring livelihood, and providing education in order to help people in the long-term. Specifically that means reducing single-use plastic materials, using nutrient-dense low-cost practical local foods, using clever multipurpose items, and empowering people with clean technology and the means for them to begin rebuilding.

Green ReLeaf is about long-term sustainable rebuilding, deploying seedlings to help families rebuild their farms and gardens of edible veggies.

Gawad Kalinga and Habitat For Humanity are both about empowering locals to rebuild their own communities.

Save Philippine Seas, a marine environment preservation org run by “chief mermaid” Anna Opposa, is raising funds for Malapascua in Northern Cebu, to go to the rebuilding of the schools and the spirits of the students and teachers

ChildFund provides Child-Centered Spaces and psychosocial support to help children cope and recover after an emergency. They also help rebuild schools and vital social infrastructure. They’ve already set up at least one child-centered space in Leyte, with trained social workers and volunteers to provide children and their caregivers with psychosocial support, along with learning activities, games, songs and dance.

Solar-powered lights to light up hospitals and evacuation centers, from a youth-led organization providing solar-powered lights to impoverished, off-grid Filipino communities.

GreenFocus Inc. (partnered with One Million Lights PH) is donating WaterBoy units that create potable water out of air, so no water sources needed.

Solar lamps: buy one, give one to the Philippines.

Waves For Water will be delivering compact portable water filtration systems thru the Romualdez foundation.

— Help send LIFESAVER 15,000 Litre jerrycans to the Philippines to provide clean sterile drinking water to a village of 50 for over 6 months.

— Send Lifestraws (pocket-sized portable water filtration systems) to typhoon victims to provide them a quick and safe way to get clean water from most water sources.

Project LightLine has University of the Philippines students recycling old chargers and batteries into disposable energy sources.

Malong Ni Mama, by Hannah and me, focusing on using local multipurpose health-promoting products with less wasteful packaging, for Guiuan, Eastern Samar.

#SlippersForSurvivors by Kage Gozun provides locally-made slippers, helping people keep their feet clean and safe as they walk around in dangerous debris-filled areas. Also partnered with Malong Ni Mama.

The Great Panty Drive provides clean underwear to typhoon survivors, helping improve sanitation and health, as well as giving them the peace of mind of having a fresh change.

Malong Ni Mama: Healthy Sustainable Relief Goods For Typhoon Survivors Of Guiuan, Eastern Samar.
Focusing on local multipurpose healthful items with less wasteful packaging.

More details—-

Typhoon Haiyan (Yolanda) has devastated parts of the Philippines, leaving thousands dead and millions lacking food, water, shelter, power, communication, and livelihood.

Read more about the devastation: http://www.anneofcarversville.com/new/2013/11/12/what-do-you-do-when-the-strongest-storm-of-the-year-typhoon.html 

As you know we go through this kind of disaster pretty much every year, and tons of plastic and instant food is sent in relief goods. We understand there’s really a dire need for these instant-use goods, and there’s definitely a place for using these items in first-response situations, but we also really need to figure out sustainable long-term solutions to mitigate waste and help us be better prepared for the next disaster.

Sustainability means improving health, reducing waste, helping the environment, and restoring livelihood opportunities in order to help people in the long-term. Specifically that means reducing single-use plastic materials, using nutrient-dense low-cost practical local foods, using clever multipurpose items, and empowering people with clean technology and the means for them to begin rebuilding.

We, Filipino creatives Hannah Liongoren and Feanne Hontiveros Mauricio, are focusing on using local multipurpose health-promoting products with less wasteful packaging, for the remote islands in Guiuan, Eastern Samar, which was where the typhoon made landfall:

Malong Ni Mama: Healthy & Sustainable Relief Efforts For Guiuan

The “malong” is a traditional Pinoy multipurpose one-size-fits-all fabric rectangle that can be adapted for use as comfortable clothing, eco-friendly bag, blanket, baby crib, and so on. Guided by Hannah’s mom, Norma Liongoren, who’s done social work in Samar and is familiar with local culture and resources, we are putting together malong-wrapped packs filled with healthy and sustainable goodies for typhoon victims in Guiuan. Our target is to prepare at least a hundred packs by Wednesday, November 20, 2013.

We are accepting donations in cash and in kind.
Send funds to Hannah Liongoren’s Paypal email address paperdull@gmail.com or contact us for bank deposit details. Please let us know if you are sending funds so we can track your donations properly, thank you.
Drop off items at Liongoren Gallery, 111 New York Ave. corner Standford, Brgy. Ermin Garcia, Cubao, Quezon City.

These are the items we plan to include in our packs:

Note: As much as possible, we are choosing products that are packaged in reusable containers, not tear-open plastic bags.

FOOD
- Dried Fish
- Bagoong
- Legumes (beans such as monggo)
- Dried Fruit
- Peanut Butter
- Banana Chips
Note: We are purchasing peanut butter (made with peanuts, butter, and coconut sugar) and banana chips from the livelihood projects of Foundation of Our Lady of Peace Mission run by Sr. Eva Maamo. - http://philippinemedicalmission.com/our-partners/foundation-of-our-lady-of-peace-mission/ - This means we hit two birds with one stone— helping typhoon victims and supporting local communities at the same time!

CLOTHING
- Malong
- Any clean clothes, sorted (adult and child) *

FOOTWEAR
- Rain boots *
- Slippers *
- Rubber shoes *

MEDICINE
- Lagundi Syrup
- Vitamin C
- Virgin Coconut Oil
- Malunggay Capsules

TOOLS & TECHNOLOGY
- Heavy Duty Gloves
- Matches
- Solar Powered Cellphone Chargers *
- Water Purification Materials *

* Items marked with asterisks are those that we need more help in acquiring.

Please help us spread the word. Thank you so much! Let us know your feedback or questions anytime.
~ Hannah Liongoren (hannahliongoren@gmail.com) & Feanne Hontiveros Mauricio (feanne@gmail.com)

Malong Ni Mama: Healthy Sustainable Relief Goods For Typhoon Survivors Of Guiuan, Eastern Samar.
Focusing on local multipurpose healthful items with less wasteful packaging.

More details—-

Typhoon Haiyan (Yolanda) has devastated parts of the Philippines, leaving thousands dead and millions lacking food, water, shelter, power, communication, and livelihood.

Read more about the devastation: http://www.anneofcarversville.com/new/2013/11/12/what-do-you-do-when-the-strongest-storm-of-the-year-typhoon.html

As you know we go through this kind of disaster pretty much every year, and tons of plastic and instant food is sent in relief goods. We understand there’s really a dire need for these instant-use goods, and there’s definitely a place for using these items in first-response situations, but we also really need to figure out sustainable long-term solutions to mitigate waste and help us be better prepared for the next disaster.

Sustainability means improving health, reducing waste, helping the environment, and restoring livelihood opportunities in order to help people in the long-term. Specifically that means reducing single-use plastic materials, using nutrient-dense low-cost practical local foods, using clever multipurpose items, and empowering people with clean technology and the means for them to begin rebuilding.

We, Filipino creatives Hannah Liongoren and Feanne Hontiveros Mauricio, are focusing on using local multipurpose health-promoting products with less wasteful packaging, for the remote islands in Guiuan, Eastern Samar, which was where the typhoon made landfall:

Malong Ni Mama: Healthy & Sustainable Relief Efforts For Guiuan

The “malong” is a traditional Pinoy multipurpose one-size-fits-all fabric rectangle that can be adapted for use as comfortable clothing, eco-friendly bag, blanket, baby crib, and so on. Guided by Hannah’s mom, Norma Liongoren, who’s done social work in Samar and is familiar with local culture and resources, we are putting together malong-wrapped packs filled with healthy and sustainable goodies for typhoon victims in Guiuan. Our target is to prepare at least a hundred packs by Wednesday, November 20, 2013.

We are accepting donations in cash and in kind.
Send funds to Hannah Liongoren’s Paypal email address paperdull@gmail.com or contact us for bank deposit details. Please let us know if you are sending funds so we can track your donations properly, thank you.
Drop off items at Liongoren Gallery, 111 New York Ave. corner Standford, Brgy. Ermin Garcia, Cubao, Quezon City.

These are the items we plan to include in our packs:

Note: As much as possible, we are choosing products that are packaged in reusable containers, not tear-open plastic bags.

FOOD
- Dried Fish
- Bagoong
- Legumes (beans such as monggo)
- Dried Fruit
- Peanut Butter
- Banana Chips
Note: We are purchasing peanut butter (made with peanuts, butter, and coconut sugar) and banana chips from the livelihood projects of Foundation of Our Lady of Peace Mission run by Sr. Eva Maamo. - http://philippinemedicalmission.com/our-partners/foundation-of-our-lady-of-peace-mission/ - This means we hit two birds with one stone— helping typhoon victims and supporting local communities at the same time!

CLOTHING
- Malong
- Any clean clothes, sorted (adult and child) *

FOOTWEAR
- Rain boots *
- Slippers *
- Rubber shoes *

MEDICINE
- Lagundi Syrup
- Vitamin C
- Virgin Coconut Oil
- Malunggay Capsules

TOOLS & TECHNOLOGY
- Heavy Duty Gloves
- Matches
- Solar Powered Cellphone Chargers *
- Water Purification Materials *

* Items marked with asterisks are those that we need more help in acquiring.

Please help us spread the word. Thank you so much! Let us know your feedback or questions anytime.
~ Hannah Liongoren (hannahliongoren@gmail.com) & Feanne Hontiveros Mauricio (feanne@gmail.com)

"Preemptive" antibiotic use is disturbingly widespread in farm animals. Some clever farmers are trying out alternative methods: probiotics; vitamin D; unusual herbal combinations such as wheat grass, nettle, garlic, and oregano; phytochemicals derived from cinnamon, garlic, and green tea.

"Preemptive" antibiotic use is disturbingly widespread in farm animals. Some clever farmers are trying out alternative methods: probiotics; vitamin D; unusual herbal combinations such as wheat grass, nettle, garlic, and oregano; phytochemicals derived from cinnamon, garlic, and green tea.

James Fallon is a happily married father of three, an award-winning neuroscientist at the University of California, Irvine, the founder of several successful biotech companies, and a scientific advisor to the US Department of Defense. He is also a psychopath.

In 2005, after decades of studying the brain scans of psychopathic killers, Fallon made a startling discovery when examining his own PET scan as part of a separate research project. His brain, Fallon discovered, looked precisely like those of the cold-blooded murderers he’d spent the last 20 years scrutinizing. And after analyzing his DNA, Fallon later uncovered that his genetic profile contained several genes strongly linked to violent, psychopathic behaviors.

After Fallon revealed the findings in a 2009 TED Talk, mainstream media latched on: he was profiled on NPR, graced the front page of the Wall Street Journal, and even inspired an episode of the TV series Criminal Minds. Now, however, Fallon is telling his own version of the story. In a new book, The Psychopath Inside (Penguin Group), Fallon takes a hard scientific look at our evolving understanding of psychopathy — through the lens of his own biology and behaviors. And the latter, as he admits, haven’t exactly been laudable: Fallon isn’t a murderer, but he writes candidly of hard partying, perpetual lying, and reckless, dangerous impulsivity — not to mention the admission that he’s never truly made an empathetic connection (even with his wife). So how does an expert in psychopathy come to terms with the disturbing symptoms of his own illness? We talked to Fallon to find out.
Read more on The Verge -The devil you know: inside the world of a psychopathic scientist

James Fallon is a happily married father of three, an award-winning neuroscientist at the University of California, Irvine, the founder of several successful biotech companies, and a scientific advisor to the US Department of Defense. He is also a psychopath.

In 2005, after decades of studying the brain scans of psychopathic killers, Fallon made a startling discovery when examining his own PET scan as part of a separate research project. His brain, Fallon discovered, looked precisely like those of the cold-blooded murderers he’d spent the last 20 years scrutinizing. And after analyzing his DNA, Fallon later uncovered that his genetic profile contained several genes strongly linked to violent, psychopathic behaviors.

After Fallon revealed the findings in a 2009 TED Talk, mainstream media latched on: he was profiled on NPR, graced the front page of the Wall Street Journal, and even inspired an episode of the TV series Criminal Minds. Now, however, Fallon is telling his own version of the story. In a new book, The Psychopath Inside (Penguin Group), Fallon takes a hard scientific look at our evolving understanding of psychopathy — through the lens of his own biology and behaviors. And the latter, as he admits, haven’t exactly been laudable: Fallon isn’t a murderer, but he writes candidly of hard partying, perpetual lying, and reckless, dangerous impulsivity — not to mention the admission that he’s never truly made an empathetic connection (even with his wife). So how does an expert in psychopathy come to terms with the disturbing symptoms of his own illness? We talked to Fallon to find out.

Read more on The Verge -The devil you know: inside the world of a psychopathic scientist